Did Mr. Doulton violate the terms they agreed upon with Mr. Chisholm?

Did Mr. Doulton violate the terms they agreed upon with Mr. Chisholm?

In Chisholm v. Doulton [1890] 22 QBD 736, the case primarily focused on Mr. Chisholm’s liability as an employer for the actions of his employee, not specifically on Mr. Doulton’s violation of terms agreed upon with Mr. Chisholm. The case did not explicitly detail any breach or violation committed by Mr. Doulton against Mr. Chisholm’s terms or agreements.

The central issue revolved around whether Mr. Chisholm, as the employer, could be held accountable for the actions of his employee, which were undertaken without Mr. Chisholm’s knowledge or authorization. The case primarily centered on the legal principle regarding employer liability rather than focusing on any breach by Mr. Doulton.

The judgment concluded that Mr. Chisholm could not be held criminally responsible for his employee’s actions performed without his knowledge or approval. Therefore, the case’s focus remained on the employer’s liability for the unauthorized actions of the employee rather than on any specific violation committed by Mr. Doulton against the terms agreed upon with Mr. Chisholm.